Showing posts with label women. Show all posts
Showing posts with label women. Show all posts

Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Screening tests for Women - Important to follow


Women Health Screening Tests- Check List
 

Screening tests
Ages 18–39
Ages 40–49
Ages 50–64
Ages 65 and older
Blood pressure test
Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.
Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.
Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.
Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.
Bone mineral density test
(osteoporosis screening)
 
 
Discuss with your doctor or nurse if you are at risk of osteoporosis.
Get this test at least once at age 65 or older.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about repeat testing.
Breast cancer screening
(mammogram)
 
Discuss with your doctor or nurse.
Starting at age 50, get screened every 2 years.
Get screened every 2 years through age 74.

Age 75 and older, ask your doctor or nurse if you need to be screened.
Cervical cancer screening
(Pap test)
Get a Pap test every 3 years if you are 21 or older and have a cervix.

If you are 30 or older, you can get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years.
Get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years if you have a cervix.
Get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years if you have a cervix.
Ask your doctor or nurse if you need to get a Pap test.
Chlamydia test
Get tested for chlamydia yearly through age 24 if you are sexually active or pregnant.

Age 25 and older, get tested for chlamydia if you are at
increased risk, pregnant or not pregnant.
Get tested for chlamydia if you are sexually active and at increased risk, pregnant or not pregnant.
Get tested for chlamydia if you are sexually active and at increased risk.
Get tested for chlamydia if you are sexually active and at increased risk.
Cholesterol test
Starting at age 20, get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.
Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.
Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.
Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.
Colorectal cancer screening
(using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy)
 
 
Starting at age 50, get screened for colorectal cancer.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about which screening test is best for you and how often you need it.
Get screened for colorectal cancer through age 75.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about which screening test is best for you and how often you need it.
Diabetes screening
Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure.
Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure.
Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure.
Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure.
Gonorrhea test
Get tested for gonorrhea if you are sexually active and at increased risk, pregnant or not pregnant.
Get tested for gonorrhea if you are sexually active and at increased risk, pregnant or not pregnant.
Get tested for gonorrhea if you are sexually active and at increased risk.
Get tested for gonorrhea if you are sexually active and at increased risk.
HIV test
Get tested for HIV at least once.

Discuss your risk with your doctor or nurse because you may need more frequent tests.

All pregnant women need to be tested for HIV.
Get tested for HIV at least once.

Discuss your risk with your doctor or nurse because you may need more frequent tests.

All pregnant women need to be tested for HIV.
Get tested for HIV at least once.

Discuss your risk with your doctor or nurse because you may need more frequent tests.
Get tested for HIV at least once if you are age 65 and have never been tested.
Get tested if you are at increased risk for HIV.

Discuss your risk with your doctor or nurse.
Syphilis test
Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk or pregnant.
Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk or pregnant.
Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk.
Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk.

 Source: Medline Plus

Sunday, 24 November 2013

Healthy Diet helps in easier pregnancy for women



SCIENTISTS say maintaining a normal weight and blood pressure and having a healthy diet can boost a woman's chances of an uncomplicated pregnancy.
Scientists from King's College London found that maintaining a normal weight and blood pressure and following a healthy diet could boost a woman's chances of an uncomplicated pregnancy.
More than 5600 first-time mothers from the UK, New Zealand, Australia and Ireland were monitored for the research, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).
The women, who were all having one baby, answered questions about their medical histories and diet.
They also had measurements taken, such as blood pressure, and underwent an ultrasound scan between 19 and 21 weeks. Details about the babies were also collected after birth.
Experts found that a healthy diet, including a high intake of fruit (at least three pieces a day) in the month leading up to conception, led to a higher chance the woman would have an uncomplicated pregnancy.
They also discovered that a healthy body mass index (BMI) and normal blood pressure boosted the chance there would be fewer problems.
Women who were in paid work when they were 15 weeks pregnant were also less likely to experience complications.
This could be because these women are less likely to abuse drugs and could be more likely to have an income which allows them to eat more healthily, the authors suggested.
While calling for further studies, the researchers said 24,674 more women a year could have an uncomplicated pregnancy if high blood pressure was brought under control.
Overall, 61 per cent of the women in the study had an uncomplicated pregnancy.
The most common reasons for a complicated pregnancy in the mother were high blood pressure (8 per cent) and pre-eclampsia (5 per cent).
In babies, the issues were being small for gestational age (11 per cent) and premature birth (4 per cent).
"We have always known that a mother's general health is important, but until now we did not know the specific factors that could be associated with a normal pregnancy," said Dr Lucy Chappell, lead author from the division of women's health at King's College London.
"Although this is an early study, these findings suggest that by leading a healthy lifestyle both before and during pregnancy - including eating lots of fruit and maintaining a healthy BMI - it could be possible for women to increase the likelihood of experiencing an uncomplicated pregnancy.
"More research needs to be done to explore these associations further but I hope that this research will help inform both public health policy makers and healthcare professionals giving advice to pregnant women and those thinking of having a baby."

Full Credit: www.News.com
Pic source:http://www.glutafin.co.uk

Friday, 10 August 2012

Empowering Women.....the SWATI way....



SWATI (Society for Women's Action and Training Initiatives), is a  non-profit organisation

based in the state of GUJARAT.

SWATI ,works on women and health too. SWATI began addressing health issues of the economically and socially marginalized women in October 1999, eventually scaling up its outreach to 49 villages of Patdi, Dhranghadra and Lakhtar talukas (blocks) of Surendranagar district. SWATI’s work on Women and Health is based on the premise that women’s health is not just a factor of poverty or availability of health services but is indicative of their status in society.

 A conscious decision to work within a human rights perspective led SWATI to adopt a process oriented approach for empowering women to understand and assume control over their bodies and health. We have extensively worked on these through community based initiatives and advocacy with the government and service providers on basic and reproductive health concerns of women.


To further reach larger people, SWATI has aligned with other groups and organizations through capacity building and networking for collective action in the areas of violence against women, right to information and advocacy for reproductive health concerns of women.

Following are the list of organisations, which SWATI joined with :



South Asia Network to Address Masculinities (SANAM)
Mahila Swaraj Abhiyan:network working to build capacities and leadership amongst Elected Women’s Representatives
Women Power Connect (WPC): national level organization of women’s groups and individuals working together for formalizing the process of legislative coordination. Our activities are aimed at influencing legislators and policy makers to frame gender-friendly policies, which impact women positively.
Jan Swasthya Abhiyan: the Indian circle of the People's Health Movement, working to establish comprehensive primary health care and action on the social determinants of health.
Janpath: A Network of NGOs working on development.
PRAVAH: A network to ensure safe, adequate and sustainable water supply for drinking and other domestic purposes to all.
To know more about SWATI, Click Here



Thursday, 21 June 2012

Health Check-up by Yashoda Hospital


The most significant factor in the success of Yashoda Hospitals is a deep commitment to quality. The

fabric of the organisation is woven with highly qualified clinicians, cutting-edge medical systems,

certified and accredited processes, and most importantly, the personal touch in patient care.

Yashoda Hospitals is ISO certified, and its labs are NABL accredited. All facilities are completely

NABH compliant and the accreditation process is almost complete at this time.


Regular health check-ups are being conducted across all yashoda hospital locations.

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